Composting Pilot Project – Brockton

Composting Pilot Project – Brockton

In 2010, Brockton’s Waste Strategies Report profiled the results of a residential waste audit conducted in the town of Walkerton. The audit revealed that well over 40% of Walkerton’s residential waste disposed of at curb side was comprised 

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Members of Brockton Environmental Advisory Committee on Composting Tour.

of food refuse.
A number of undesirable externalities
[1] are associated with the landfilling of both commercial and residential food waste, which range from economic concerns to environmental and social consequences.  When food waste is transported to area landfills, the valuable waste capacity is significantly reduced.

The Municipality of Southgate, Ontario has estimated that their landfill capacity may be extended for up to an additional 40 years as a result of their organics diversion program.[2] A similar diversion program in Brockton would result in significant savings as the development of new landfill sites would not be required for a number of decades. The environmental assessment costs alone prior to the expansion of the current Hanover-Walkerton landfill were in excess of one million dollars with an additional six million dollars in associated operational costs during the lifespan of the site.In 2010, Brockton’s Waste Strategies Report profiled the results of a residential waste audit conducted in the town of Walkerton. The audit revealed that well over 40% of Walkerton’s residential waste disposed of at curb side was comprised of food refuse.

Food waste deposited in landfills decomposes resulting in the creation of methane gas which is a major contributor to climate change, and ultimately significant mitigation costs. Leachate from the Hanover-Walkerton landfill site must be collected and transported to either Walkerton or Hanover’s sewage treatment plants at a projected cost of approximately one hundred thousand dollars per year. [3]

Communities that have opted to divert organics from landfills have been able to reduce the number of curbside collections of non-organic waste throughout the entire year resulting in significant savings.

This report will illustrate four potential options for the diversion of residential food waste from Brockton’s landfill sites.  These options include expanded backyard composting, the development of a community composting project pilot site, the diversion of residential food waste to Walkerton’s sewage treatment plant for methane gas collection and electrical generation, and finally an exploration of the export of residential organics to a facility located in Southern Ontario.  It is likely that a combination of two or three of the options noted above could be implemented in a complimentary fashion in a waste diversion program.

[1] “In economics, an externality is the cost or benefit that affects a third party who did not choose to incur that cost or benefit. Air pollution from motor vehicles is an example of negative externality. The costs of the air pollution for the rest of society is not compensated for by either the producers or users of motorized transport”. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Externality

[2] Phone Discussion with Municipality of Southgate, Dec 2014

[3] Bruce Davidson, Hanover Brockton Waste Management Committee Member

To read the full report just follow this link Food Waste to Fertilizer

 

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Green Bin products in windrow at Southgate Waste Management Facility

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Triple Bin collection vehicle at Southgate – green, blue and black.

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Alltreat facility in Arthur with aerobic windrow composting system.

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Outgoing compost product from Alltreat.